Automobile

Understanding High Mileage Oil

When it comes to using high-mileage oils, there are two schools of thought. When your vehicle reaches 75,000 miles, the first option is to switch. The second option is to upgrade if your older vehicle’s engine is beginning to loosen. When you observe an oil drip, it’s time to switch to high-mileage engine oil. If your engine “sounds louder” and you hear a new rattling noise, your engine may benefit from a denser oil.

Don’t change your engine oil if you’re not experiencing any problems. Because high-mileage oils are frequently not API approved, I recommend waiting until your vehicle’s warranty period has expired before making a swap.

understanding high oil mileage

In this article, you’ll get answers to the following questions:

  • What is high mileage oil?
  • How does high mileage oil works?
  • Who should use high mileage oil?
  • What are the benefits of high mileage oil?
  • What is the difference between regular oil and high-mileage oil?
  • High mileage oil vs synthetic oil
  • Is high mileage oil worth the money?
  • Is it ok to change old car oil once a month?
  • Can high mileage oil and regular oil be mixed?

 

Read more: How to change car engine oil?

What is high mileage oil?

As the name suggests, this type of motor oil is designed to handle the unique issues that high mileage vehicles, or those with more than 75,000 miles, face. It can help older engines consume less oil, produce less smoke, and emit fewer emissions. Leaks and oil seepage are also reduced using high mileage oil.

While you can use high mileage oil in a newer car without harming it, the concerns that high mileage oil resolves aren’t normally present in cars with less than 75,000 miles.

How does high mileage oil works?

High-mileage oil functions as a multivitamin, repairing worn engine parts and avoiding future wear and tear.

Less oil seeps out of your engine as the seal conditioners in high mileage oil expand and renew seals. As a result, less oil is consumed, resulting in fewer oil changes and engine troubles down the road.

High-mileage lubricants also contain antioxidants, detergents, and additives to reduce wear and friction—all of which are beneficial to engines that have outlived their usefulness. These components remove the dirt and sludge that accumulates over time while also reducing friction, allowing your engine to purr like a cat.

Read more: How long does it take to change a car engine oil?

Who should use high mileage oil?

Cars with an odometer reading of more than 75,000 miles can usually benefit from high mileage oil. Engine seals can degrade over time, regardless of mileage, so even older vehicles with lower kilometers can benefit. Degraded seals result in oil leaks, and oil leaks indicate that your engine isn’t performing at its best. Consider high mileage oil if you experience the following in your car:

  • When you pull your car out of the garage, you notice oil marks on the ground where it was parked. Oil drippings could signal that engine parts are loosening.
  • You detect oil stains on lower engine parts when you check under the hood.
  • Your engine is a little louder than usual. A rattling noise could indicate that your engine needs denser motor oil, such as high mileage oil.
  • Stick to regularly planned preventative maintenance treatments, especially oil changes with high mileage oil, if you want to keep your vehicle running for a long time. When oil companies talk about “high mileage cars,” they usually mean vehicles with 75,000 miles or more on the odometer.

 

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What are the benefits of high mileage oil?

High-mileage oil addresses certain weaknesses in your engine caused by wear and tear. It’s like an antiseptic for overworked engine parts. Reduced oil consumption: Due to deteriorated engine seals, older automobiles leak and consume more oil than newer ones. Degraded seals are rejuvenated with high mileage oil, resulting in less oil consumption and burn-off.

Less engine sludge: sludge left behind by other motor oils tends to collect in older engines. Sludge is broken up and dissolved by high mileage oil. Protection against damage: Vehicles with high mileage have more general wear and tear than those with lower mileage. High-mileage oil contains chemicals that preserve and protect the entire engine.

What is the difference between regular oil and high-mileage oil?

Special antioxidants, detergents, and additives in high-mileage oil can assist prevent engine wear and sludge accumulation.

Importantly, high mileage oil helps prevent brittle aging seals and gaskets from creating leaks, which are normally indicated by oil streaks on the pavement where the automobile is parked. This can result in higher oil consumption and, in the worst-case scenario, significant engine damage.

Read more: What are the reasons for oil leaks in my car when packed?

High mileage oil vs synthetic oil

Synthetic oils are typically used in high-mileage applications. They’re usually made with 100% synthetic oil or a combination of synthetic and conventional oil. Synthetic oil provides better protection in extremely hot temperatures, and its ability to flow freely in cold weather aids engine starts in icy conditions. High mileage oil, whether fully synthetic or partially synthetic, is more expensive than ordinary grade oil.

As with conventional oil, high mileage synthetic or synthetic mix oil comes in a variety of weights that are labeled according to their viscosity, which is a measurement of an oil’s thickness or resistance to flow.

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Is high mileage oil worth the money?

Though it adds a layer of protection for older automobiles, some sources claim that a high mileage blend isn’t worth the extra money if the engine isn’t already leaking or burning oil excessively. If that’s the case, utilizing a higher viscosity (thicker) conventional oil and/or stop-leak additives to strengthen seals can be a less expensive option.

Is it ok to change old car oil once a month?

Drivers should check the oil level at least once a month between oil changes to help protect the life of an older car, truck, or SUV’s engine since extended driving with a low oil level can cause engine damage.

Follow the recommendations in your owner’s manual if your car requires more oil. When the amount shown by your engine’s dipstick reaches or falls below the “ADD” marking, add a quart of oil.

Read more: Understanding car oil filter

Can high mileage oil and regular oil be mixed?

Despite what some drivers assume, you can mix high mileage motor oil with conventional or synthetic motor oil (or vice versa) in your car’s crankcase if the necessity arises, albeit you’ll lose some of the high mileage oil’s benefits in the process. You can also move from one type to another without risking engine damage during consecutive oil changes.

In summary

High mileage oil usage should be considered at a specific stage of an automobile’s life. Although some modern cars are designed to use high-mileage oil, if not, ensure your car manufacturer’s warranty ends before considering using it. Also, high mileage oil can be mixed with commercial or synthetic oil.

I hope you learn a lot from this article, where these questions are being answered:

  • What is high mileage oil?
  • How does high mileage oil works?
  • Who should use high mileage oil?
  • What are the benefits of high mileage oil?
  • What is the difference between regular oil and high-mileage oil?
  • High mileage oil vs synthetic oil
  • Is high mileage oil worth the money?
  • Is it ok to change old car oil once a month?
  • Can high mileage oil and regular oil be mixed?

If so, kindly share with others. Thanks for reading, see you around!