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Different types of electric arc welding process

Today I will be discussing the different types of electric arc welding and their working. Previously, an article was published on arc welding. Check out!

Understanding electric arc welding

Types of electric arc welding

Different types of arc welding can be categorized into two namely; consumable and non-consumable electrodes. The consumable electrode arc welding is MIG, SMAW, ESW, SW. while the non-consumable electrode types are TIG and PAW. All these are abbreviations of their names.

Types of arc welding with consumable electrodes

Metal inert gas welding (MIG)

These types of arc welding are also known as gas metal arc welding (GMAW). It uses a shielding gas to protect the base metals from defilement.

Metal inert gas welding (MIG)

Read more: Understanding metal inert gas welding (MIG)

Shielded metal arc welding (SMAW)

These types are also known as manual metal arc welding (MMA or MMAW), flux shielded arc, or stick welding. it is achieved by striking the arc between the metal rod (electrode flux coated) and the workpiece. The metal rod and workpiece joint surface melt and form a pool. These two-contact form gas and slag, helping to protect the weld pool from the surrounding atmosphere. That is why this perfect for joining ferrous and nonferrous metals with a range of material thickness in all positions

Shielded metal arc welding (SMAW)

Read more: Understanding shielded arc welding (SMAW) 

Flux core arc welding (FCAW)

This arc welding serves the alternative purpose of SMAW, FCAM using a continuous feed of consumable flux core electrode and a constant voltage power supply. It helps in providing constant arc length. These types of arc welding can use a shielding gas or gas created by the flux to provide protection from contamination.

Flux core arc welding (FCAW)

Read more: Understanding flux-cored arc welding

Submerged arc welding (SAW)

This process also uses continuous-fed consumable electrodes and a blanket of fusible flux. It becomes conductive when molten provides a current path between the parts and the current and electrode. Flux also prevents spatter and sparks while suppressing fumes and ultraviolet radiation.

Submerged arc welding (SAW)

Read more: Understanding submerged arc welding

Electro-slag welding (ESW)

These types of arc welding are welding is used to vertically weld a thick plate above 25mm in a single. It works on an electric arc before flux helps to extinguish the arc. This flux melts immediately after the wire consumable is fed into the molten pool. It creates a molten slag on top of the pool.

Electro-slag welding (ESW)

Read more: Understanding electro slag welding 

Arc stud welding (SW)

This arc welding process is similar to flash welding, it is used to join nuts or fasteners with a flange and nubs that melt in order to produce the joint to another meal piece.

Read more: Understanding Arc stud welding and its techniques

Non-consumable electrode methods

Tungsten inert gas welding (TIG)

This consumable arc welding is known as gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). It uses a tungsten electrode to create the arc and inert shielding gas to protect the weld and molten pool against atmospheric contamination.

Tungsten inert gas welding (TIG) 

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Read more: Understanding tungsten inert gas welding (TIG)

Plasma arc welding (PAW)

Plasma arc welding is similar to TIG welding. it uses an electric arc of a non-consumable electrode and an anode, they are placed within the body of the torch. The plasma is obtained from the electric arc. This arc is also used to ionize the gas in the torch, which is pushed through a fine borehole in the anode to reach the base metal. This separates the plasma from the shielding gas.

Plasma arc welding (PAW) 

Read more: Understanding plasma arc welding

That is all for this article, where the various types of electric arc welding are discussed. I hope you enjoyed the reading, if so, kindly share with other students. Thanks for reading, see you next time!

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